Our commitment, at SeeCarbonRun, is to manage carbon.  Applying Peter Drucker’s philosophy that “if you don’t measure it, you can’t manage it”, we’re starting...

Our commitment, at SeeCarbonRun, is to manage carbon.  Applying Peter Drucker’s philosophy that “if you don’t measure it, you can’t manage it”, we’re starting out by measuring carbon.

SeeCarbonRun takes public business announcements and looks at them from the perspective of their carbon impact. We then project the impact over time. The calculated impact is in our wiki, which anyone can edit, and the result is displayed in a chart at the bottom of each article.  All the results for the day are added together and built into our model that shows the amount of carbon in the atmosphere.  We can then compare our calculated results with the various climate projections from the IPCC to see how different sectors are projected to contribute, and what impact they actually make.

We’re going to include articles on lots of topics.

  • business as usual – activities where waste resources are not managed
  • resource efficient – activities where waste resources are closely managed
  • carbon removal – activities where carbon is removed from the atmosphere

The calculation of how much carbon is in the atmosphere is

business as usual (+) resource efficient (-) carbon removal (+) everything we haven’t yet documented.

Our first objective at SeeCarbonRun is to have the value of “everything we haven’t yet documented” be as small as possible.

Note: When we say carbon, we mean it.  Carbon dioxide is the major form of carbon that is in the atmosphere, and the volume of it varies with temperature and air pressure.  To accurately compare one article with another, we’re creating a model where the oxygen has been removed, and what is left is the black powder form of carbon.

Like all models, it’s not real, and it does allow us to better understand how the world works.

Angus

A passionate climate change solution builder: always exploring, seeking new & existing tools to extract atmospheric carbon and turn it into something useful

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